Monday, 14 August 2017

Understanding Data Warehouse Automation

For an ordinary person, we likely hear crickets chirping when we hear others talk extensively about computers using unheard of computer jargons. Understanding many of these computer concepts and terms isn’t an easy feat, so we often just stick to what we know best: social media and the Internet.

However, if you are an entrepreneur, you need to familiarize yourself with these tech concepts especially if you have plans of expanding your business across different platforms and corners of the globe. Going digital is inevitable and you need to have a great and efficient computing system in place to manage and store your data, so you know just what is happening to your business all the time.

To quote the Data Warehouse Institute (TDWI) from WhereScape’s own pages, “Data warehouse automation is much more than simply automating the development process. It encompasses all of the core processes of data warehousing including design, development, testing, deployment, operations, impact analysis, and change management.”

(Via: http://www.computerweekly.com/blog/CW-Developer-Network/What-is-data-warehouse-automation)

Simply put, data warehouse automation is a process wherein you automate and accelerate the development cycles of data warehouse without compromising consistency and quality. In short, you just automate the entire process. This is especially helpful in big enterprises that handle big data in their daily operations to let you do more things quite faster without spending a fortune on it.

So online grocery is hard, and doing it profitably demands extraordinary levels of efficiency powered by the creative application of technology and automation. For a traditional retailer, building that solution is a massive and daunting prospect. Yet online is also a phenomenon that is here to stay, because customers want the convenience, enjoy the choice, and appreciate the time they don’t have to waste trudging around a conventional store.

The great thing about having an online grocery delivery pipeline into customers’ homes is that, once it’s in place and being used regularly, all manner of other products and services can potentially flow up and down it. If you can do online grocery, then you can do some other forms of online retail; but the reverse definitely does not implicitly follow. The potential size of the worldwide online grocery market combined with these spin-off opportunities is why grocery really is the holy grail of online retail.

That’s the end business case we put forward at Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, currently operating in the UK. Unlike other online retailers, our customers’ orders are picked and packed in huge automated warehouses before being delivered to their kitchen tables in one-hour slots by Ocado’s own delivery fleet. All the technology that powers this disruptive business model has been built in-house over the past 17 years. Ocado has been profitable at an order level for many years but has chosen to invest heavily in building its technology platform.

(Via: https://hbr.org/sponsored/2017/05/how-an-online-grocery-platform-could-reshape-retail-as-we-know-it)

Although generally used by a local business, an online grocery system is the perfect smaller-scale example of data warehouse automation at work. They have an extensive yet efficient data management system in place to keep track of inventory, supplier details, customer details and many others. It ensures the grocers move the items on time to gain profits and cut down on losses from spoiled produce.

It’s not clear if Amazon has made any strides towards developing the futuristic "robot vans" mentioned in the CNBC story. But considering this is the company that recently made its first delivery by drone, the prospect doesn’t really seem that farfetched.

The big upside for automated delivery is the savings that come from operating with no labor costs and maximum efficiency. As the Barclays report notes, 80% of grocery delivery costs are attributed to labor expenses and wages. The upfront investment needed to install this technology is significant, but this is where Amazon has a significant advantage. The e-commerce giant has capital to burn. Low-margin traditional retailers, by contrast, just don’t have as much money to invest in this kind of advanced technology.

Combined with Amazon’s data-mining capabilities, growing infrastructure and flat-out ambition to become a dominant player in grocery, automation offers another way for the online retailer to quickly scale up. Granted, that may not seem like much of a threat given the company’s current operations. So far, AmazonFresh has grown very slowly, expanding to just over a dozen markets in the span of 10 years. 

(Via: http://www.fooddive.com/news/grocery--can-amazon-earn-grocery-dominance-with-more-automation/441720/)

Another great example of a company that uses data warehouse automation and became successful at it is no other than Amazon itself. Amazon Fresh provided an avenue for online grocery retailers to reach out to a wider market by selling their products online and providing grocery delivery in America. People these days prefer online shopping rather than going to physical stores and supermarkets to shop for things, which is why companies that can master the process of data warehouse automation may hit the jackpot and thrive where others have failed.

Meanwhile, the problem of hard drive failure and the consequent data loss is an issue experienced by almost everyone now and then. When that happens to you and you are using a Seagate hard drive, this link http://www.harddriverecovery.org/seagate-data-recovery.html may help you understand what really happens during its recovery. If you are using an older system, though, like a RAID 10, this post on RAID 10 Data Recovery http://www.harddriverecovery.org/raidcenter/raid-10-data-recovery.html is probably what you are looking for to help you fully understand how to recover lost data using this system.

Understanding Data Warehouse Automation was first published on Hard Drive Recovery Group



source http://www.harddriverecovery.org/blog/understanding-data-warehouse-automation/

Monday, 7 August 2017

Protect Your Data From Malicious Malware

We are now living in a digital world. It means that we use computers in carrying out different tasks or functions whether on a personal basis or not. Almost all homes are equipped with a computer or laptop and have their own Internet or WiFi connection too. The latter is even considered as a necessity these days and no longer a luxury that it once was before smart technology took over the world.

The use of smartphones and smart gadgets boosts the popularity of the Internet. Aside from that, the centralizing of business and government processes left us with millions to billions of data that needs to be stored properly and can be accessed whenever the need arises. It’s too bad that cyber criminals always find a way to disrupt the world order and cause undue stress among its innocent victims.

Disaster has struck—an unwanted piece of malware took root on your computer. So what's your next step? While the potential damage viruses can cause shouldn't be underestimated, you might be able to get your computer back on its feet without too much difficulty, thanks to an array of helpful tools at your disposal.

We're using the term malware to refer to all kinds of computer nasties, from viruses to ransomware to adware. While each of these threats have their own definitions, the terms are often used interchangeably, and can mean different things to different people. So for simplicity's sake, when we say malware, we mean everything you don't want on your computer, from a virus that tries to delete your files to an adware program that's tracking your web browsing.

(Via: http://www.popsci.com/remove-malware-from-computer)

First and foremost, you must realize that there is a problem and it is pretty obvious too. A warning message will often appear on your screen but there are instances when it does not show at all. Other warning signs to watch out for include crashing applications, lots of pop-ups showing on your browser, and a crawling system.

The basic idea behind ransomware is simple: A criminal hacks into your computer, scrambles your files with unbreakable encryption, and then demands that you pay for the encryption key needed to unscramble the files. If you have important files on your computer, you might be willing to pay a lot to avoid losing them.

Ransomware schemes have become a lot more effective since the invention of Bitcoin in 2009. Conventional payment networks like Visa and Mastercard make it difficult to accept payments without revealing your identity. Bitcoin makes that a lot easier. So the past four years have seen a surge in ransomware schemes striking unsuspecting PC users.

Some ransomware schemes are so sophisticated that they even invest in customer service, helping victims who want to pay their ransoms navigate the complexities of obtaining bitcoins and making bitcoin payments.

(Via: https://www.vox.com/new-money/2017/5/12/15632482/ransomware-explained)

To protect your PC from ransomware attacks, it is a must to conduct regular checkups. Remember that hackers can only encrypt and steal files saved on your PC, so setting up a backup can save you from a headache caused by such an attack. The only unfortunate thing about this is that most individuals and businesses don’t have a backup plan in place, so they are easily victimized by cyber criminals. Also, it seems that the computers affected were Windows PC because of vulnerability in Windows that wasn’t yet discovered before.

Malware is indeed a cause of concern for computer users. However, there is actually more common computer issues that are just as stressful yet don’t usually get the attention it deserves. For instance, hard drive problems are quite common than we would like to admit and everyone is vulnerable to it. If you also don’t backup your files, on say, an external hard drive, you might lose all data saved on your hard drive once it fails. If your hard drive is failing and you need it fixed right away, http://www.harddriverecovery.org/repair-hard-drive.html can help you fix that hard drive and help retrieve all your precious data for you. Meanwhile, if you are still using an old Windows XP or Vista computer, you may likewise encounter a disk read error, this article http://www.harddriverecovery.org/errors/disk_read_error.html can give you tips on how to address this issue. We also offer our expert assistance for a professional service that won’t break the bank.

The blog post Protect Your Data From Malicious Malware Find more on: http://www.harddriverecovery.org



source http://www.harddriverecovery.org/blog/protect-your-data-from-malicious-malware/

Understanding Data Warehouse Automation

For an ordinary person, we likely hear crickets chirping when we hear others talk extensively about computers using unheard of computer jarg...